RAID 0, 1, 5, 6 or 10 – Image Editing – Part 2of2

After considering the options I opted to configure the 4 drive R4 Promise Pegasus unit with RAID 10. Despite losing half the available storage I felt this would suit my image editing workflow best. Providing fast throughput while providing a good level of redundancy should I lose one drive or even two, I would still be able to continue working. As soon as the R4 begins to get near to full capacity I will remove images which will already have been backed up.

A little about the unit and my initial experience.

The R4 ships ready to use configured with a RAID 5 logical drive. As soon as you plug the unit in, it begins the synchronisation process which takes several hours. The drive comes with the Promise Utility app already installed so you just have to drag this to your applications folder. Once the syncronisation had completed I decide to go ahead and change from RAID 5 to RAID 10. The process of configuring a new logical drive using the Promise Utility application is straight forward once you discover how to do it. As a first time user of both a RAID drive and to Promise, I didn’t understand the need to delete both the logical drive and disc array in order to change the RAID level. Helpfully the Promise utility app provides a wizard for simplifying this process however it does not automatically delete the array and drive when you want to change raid level in fact no options are available in the wizard until you have deleted those two elements. I was puzzled by this at first and disappointed that the Promise Pegasus Utility manual did not feel the gap for new users and explain the need to delete the disc array and logical drive.

It took some quite extensive research via the net to discover exactly what was needed. I also contacted Promise support although this proved to be a complex and unhelpful process.

RAID 0, 1, 5, 6 or 10 – Image Editing – Part 1of2

Which RAID level should I use for image editing?

Going to invest in a Promise Pegasus 4 disk RAID array for the purpose of keeping much of my image editing work away from from my main on board computer hard drive. I would like to also have a large volume where much of my recent work can be kept in order to access it quickly. I currently store job images on my onboard computer HD while editing and processing. This work gets backed up daily to three external hard drives. Two are  kept on site and  eventually archived, with the third kept off site . I also back up my onboard hard drive to a bootable copy. While also backing up other important files to cloud storage.

This has worked as a great backup system for many years until the release of the new Apple Mac Pro. On this computer onboard storage is limited to 1TB maximum. Because of this I very quickly have to move job images onto the external hard drives in order to make room for new work. This is fine although often I need to access the work on the external drives for a quite a long period. Finally it would make sense to have the current active work mirrored, so that if I do have a HD failure I can continue to work, while the failed drive is replaced.

The options for the best RAID levels are a choice 0, 1, 5, 6, or 10. Each provides advantages and disadvantages with respect to performance and security. I am not going to provide an explanation of each. A good explanation of the different RAID levels can be found here by this excellent blog post by Pre pressure.com http://www.prepressure.com/library/technology/raid. or on wikipedia.

So the question is which RAID level would be most suitable to provide performance and security with 4 discs?

15 Year’s of Healthcare photography

This will be my 15th year taking photographs for some of the most prestigious private and public healthcare organisations. I began my freelance career in 2000 and I have since amassed a great deal of experience working within many varied healthcare environments from A&E, operating theatres, ITU, paediatrics, Oncology, x-ray, cath lab to general /dental practice, care homes for the elderly and services for those with learning difficulties. I have met wonderful staff and patients who agree to be photographed in sometimes difficult circumstances.

I have enjoyed this type of work a great deal as it has offered me a chance to work within exciting but challenging situations with often strict time constraints and space to work.  Photographing operations provides some of the most interesting and challenging healthcare photography to create, I feel privileged to be allowed into this environment and to witness critical life saving work in progress.

My first experience of photographing an operation was during a hip replacement procedure at a private hospital. I was apprehensive at first and daunted especially when the time came to put on scrubs and enter the theatre, having a vivid imagination does not help. My fears though were quickly dispelled by the understanding staff who were in good humour and put me at ease straight away eventually goading me to get closer to the action and better images, they recounted tales of other first timers to operations who fainted during their visit requiring medical assistance themselves. Its tempting in these situations to stand in a corner and remain there, out of the way of the busy staff, fearful of distracting anyone or stepping into a sterile area. Some of the best images I have taken were at close proximity to the staff and operating area. Of course sometimes this is not appropriate and remaining out of the way in a corner is the best place to be. I am still learning about working in these environments and discovering new ways to approach the subject matter with unique viewpoints, use of lighting and exposure.

Healthcare Photography

Instagram Feed Test

2014 Roundup

2014 has been a wirlwind year. My duaghter Eleanor was born in May and she is a beautiful joy to spend time with. Between power naps and nappy changes the last year has proven especially busy with lots of travel both abroad and in the UK. Photoshoot trips to regions of the UK I would not otherwise have visited and journeys further afield to Barcelona. I have been privileged to meet some amazing healthcare staff and see them at work. It’s been a pleasure to continue to collaborate with my long standing clients, producing creative work for annual reports, websites, marketing and advertising. I am looking forward to producing and developing more creative output in 2015.

I have also upgraded and added new equipment to my kit. The Nikon D810 and D800 currently the only DSLR 35mm cameras capable of producing 36 megapixel files, the largest digital image files available from a camera in this class. In conjunction with this I have upgraded my computer and storage in order to maintain an efficient workflow that can handle the larger files sizes produced by the D800 cameras.

Below is a small sample of photography completed during 2014.

MERRY CHRISTMAS & HAPPY NEW YEAR!!


Raasay from Isle of Skye with christmas lights

Instagram Round Up

Royal Rota

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